Content marketing magic

With content marketing being the chatter on twitter; the murmuration in marketing; and the bombination on bizitalk, it still strikes me as interesting that businesses are either not using the facility at all, or getting the message so wrong.

Whilst its primary objective still aims to generate leads, interest and hopefully conversions; content marketing is about so much more. As Simon Grover explains in a great post by Quietroom, the potential of losing something is a stronger motivation than that of gaining something. One good piece of content might lead to one, or several, decent sale(s), which is all well and good if your business is based on front-end sales. However, unless you’re an ice cream vendor on a beach in Benidorm, you are probably going to want repeat customers; those who value you, your ideas and your input.

Forging fickle content for the sake of filler is a mistake businesses often make in marketing campaigns. Or worse yet, creating content so drenched in keywords that slippery puddles of desperation ooze across your branding. Unfortunately in a sector so saturated in lists and tick sheets, many businesses are afraid to fly away from the rest.

Create something that feels different.

To speak to customers in a language that is entertaining, distinctive and inarguably yours is what really matters in creating memorable content. Of course hitting out once and commissioning an outstanding piece of crafted content to intrigue, inspire,  and educate your followers may see a peak in traffic for a specific duration, it is maintaining that unique tone across all communications, and for an extended period that is going to make clients care.

Crave something they don’t have. And want it.

Essentially what you’re hoping to create is a resource that is valuable in the content you disseminate; whether didactic, descriptive or entertaining. You see, what you want is a type of engagement that brings people back for more. An experience that evokes emotions. The adage: people won’t remember what you say, but how you made them feel can be assimilated to what you want to achieve here.

Creating a feeling of trust, faith and understanding means they will come back. It may take some time, but they will – at some point. They’ll return because they want to repeat the experience you created for them before.

And when that time comes, they must be made to feel welcome in the same unique tone they have come to expect from your brand; developing the relationship.

A cohesive approach across all outlets requires some strategic thinking. With that said, whilst shaping sheltering content is important in nurturing relationships with your brand, what you’re producing does need to have value for you too. Before you even start drafting your content; have a clear idea of who it’s for and what they will get from it. And also have a clear idea of how it correlates to your objectives as a brand.

If you are considering ordering high quality content, you must have a realistic understanding of the relationships you wish to establish  with clients, and pragmatically envisage a timescale for developing them as such. Trust across the digital airwaves is no less tangible than trust in real life. It takes time and effort from both parties. Through investing in a sustainable content plan over a specified time period, and through partnering this with effective distribution channels you have created marketing magic.